Why wasn’t CA’s Flex Alert canceled when temperatures dropped?

Wednesday was predicted to be another day with temperatures well above 100 degrees in many parts of California, prompting the state’s grid operators to call on residents to conserve energy. Yet it wasn’t as hot as anticipated, and it was instead cloudy for much of the day. Regardless, California Independent System Operator kept its call to action to save power in effect. Cal ISO issues these when it expects a strain on its power grid because of increased energy demand when temperatures get hotter. And Cal ISO anticipated that for Wednesday, which was expected to be hot like it was on Tuesday. . Wednesday’s high temperature was recorded at 92 degrees for the Sacramento area, a major change in temperature from what was initially predicted. But despite the noticeable drop in heat, Cal ISO did not cancel its Flex Alert. KCRA 3 asked why the Flex Alert was issued and why it was not canceled when temperatures did not get as hot as expected. The agency wrote back explaining that it called the alert “because of supply uncertainty, and the conservation will help protect grid reliability. “Cal ISO also said it does not have any other Flex Alerts currently planned. KCRA 3 Meteorologist Mark Finan said a cloud cover was expected on Wednesday, but it’s much thicker than what was expected. Because of those clouds, most valley temperatures were below 100 degrees.

Wednesday was predicted to be another day with temperatures well above 100 degrees in many parts of California, prompting the state’s grid operators to call on residents to conserve energy.

Yet it wasn’t as hot as anticipated, and it was instead cloudy for much of the day. Regardless, California Independent System Operator kept its call to action to save power in effect.

That call to action for Californians is known as a Flex Alert. Cal ISO issues these when it expects a strain on its power grid because of increased energy demand when temperatures get hotter. And Cal ISO anticipated that for Wednesday, which was expected to be hot like it was on Tuesday.

On Tuesday, the Sacramento area saw its hottest day of the year so far at 108 degrees, and many areas in the Northern California region had similar temperatures. Wednesday’s high temperature was recorded at 92 degrees for the Sacramento area, a major change in temperature from what was initially predicted.

But despite the noticeable drop in heat, Cal ISO did not cancel its Flex Alert. KCRA 3 asked why the Flex Alert was issued and why it was not canceled when temperatures did not get as hot as expected.

The agency wrote back explaining that it called the alert “because of supply uncertainty, and the conservation will help protect grid reliability.”

Cal ISO also said it does not have any other Flex Alerts currently planned.

KCRA 3 Meteorologist Mark Finan said a cloud cover was expected on Wednesday, but it’s much thicker than what was expected. Because of those clouds, most valley temperatures were below 100 degrees.

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