2 guns recovered from Boston high school; 2 students arrested

Two guns were recovered Thursday in a “serious security breach” at Charlestown High School in Boston, Massachusetts, officials said. The student was charged with illegal possession of a firearm, a 9mm Glock, not at work or home and illegal possession of ammunition and held on $2,500 bail. The judge also ordered home confinement and for the student to stay away from Charlestown High School and any witnesses. A short time later, Boston police confirmed a second gun was found in the school. A 17-year-old was charged with possession of a firearm, and delinquency to wit. He will be arraigned Friday. No shots were fired, and no was injured, police said. Students said metal detectors were removed from the school during the pandemic. “There were metal detectors here before. They were taken out due to COVID rules, since we had to be six feet. I feel like the metal detectors should have stayed in school,” said junior Brandon Myers. “They took the metal detectors off and we never expected this to happen, so it’s kind of surprising and scary,” senior Anyara Urbaez. Some students were let out early, while others boarded school buses around the normal dismissal time. “She called me crying because it’s scary to have something happen,” said the mother of a 13-year-old student at the school. “Call me crying, ‘You pick me up.’ I say, ‘OK.’” In a statement, Boston Public Schools said Thursday’s incidents represent “a serious security breach that will not be tolerated … Our schools must be safe learning environments where students and staff feel secure.”BPS said it was working with Boston Police and BPS Safety Services. “Over the next few days, additional adult and safety personnel will be present at the school,” the statement continued. “The guns seized today in Charlestown High School present yet another reminder that this is not just a problem for police or for prosecutors or for school staff,” said Suffolk County District Attorney Kevin Hayden. “It’s a problem for all of society, a problem that demands discussion in boardrooms and backyards and everywhere in between.” More than 730 students are enrolled in the school that serves grades 9 to 12. The high school also includes a middle school on the fifth floor for grades 7 and 8.

Two guns were recovered Thursday in a “serious security breach” at Charlestown High School in Boston, Massachusetts, officials said.

One of the guns was recovered from a 13-year-old student at the Medford Street school.

The student’s name has not been released because the teen is a minor.

A short time later, Boston police confirmed a second gun was found in the school.

A 17-year-old was charged with possession of a firearm, and delinquency to wit. He will be sponsored Friday.

No shots were fired, and no was injured, police said.

Students said metal detectors were removed from the school during the pandemic.

“There were metal detectors here before. They were taken out due to COVID rules, since we had to be six feet. I feel like the metal detectors should have stayed in school,” said junior Brandon Myers.

“They took the metal detectors off and we never expected this to happen, so it’s kind of surprising and scary,” senior Anyara Urbaez.

Some students were let out early, while others boarded school buses around the normal dismissal time.

“She called me crying because it’s scary to have something happen,” said the mother of a 13-year-old student at the school. “Call me crying, ‘You pick me up.’ I say, ‘OK.’”

In a statement, Boston Public Schools said Thursday’s incidents represent “a serious security breach that will not be tolerated … Our schools must be safe learning environments where students and staff feel secure.”

BPS said it was working with Boston Police and BPS Safety Services.

“Over the next few days, additional adult and safety personnel will be present at the school,” the statement continued.

“The guns seized today in Charlestown High School present yet another reminder that this is not just a problem for police or for prosecutors or for school staff,” said Suffolk County District Attorney Kevin Hayden. “It’s a problem for all of society, a problem that demands discussion in boardrooms and backyards and everywhere in between.”

More than 730 students are enrolled in the school that serves grades 9 to 12. The high school also includes a middle school on the fifth floor for grades 7 and 8.

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